Thursday, May 05, 2011

"Not A Party Of Power, A Party Of Purpose"

Don't read anything into this post, but I believe it a sort of template sentiment moving forward. The fact it was discussed in 2006, a bit disappointing now, but I believe every Liberal should listen, because it's where we always had to go (video not best quality):





Why now? In my last post I discussed the past, reminded me of an old speech, came up in the comments, but not the one I remembered. That Kennedy speech in Vancouver in particular- dreadful video aside- is still some of the best stuff I've heard since I joined the party.

9 comments:

Jer said...

That is a pretty good speech...too bad he lost his seat. Its hard to be leader, when you are not in parliament. I suppose a Liberal MP could resign for any "outside of parliament" leader to run in a by election, but that seems dangerous. You may recall that John Tory tried to do this in Peterborough after losing his run at a seat in Toronto, it didn't end well for him.

Steve V said...

I didn't intend to go there. Leadership for another time.

bionicliberal said...

If we'd had a real democratic process in place to choose a leader in 2006 we could have avoided a lot of the pain we're all feeling today. What a waste of talent and vision.

Steve V said...

I joined the party because of renewal, here we sit five years later, still talking. But, that's the past, we needed to get decimated before everyone understood. Torn down, there's nothing left to shelter reality, I'm convinced now we can rebuild this, just listen to the right voices, still old agendas around.

wiseliberal said...

Lot of people run for leaderships without a seat and succeed-the latest is Christy Clark!

However, it is not about leadership right now- not sure if Kennedy could be convinced to try again after all the crap thrown his way.

We need people like him and the ideas they have. You cannot help but feel inspired by listening to him talk.

We need a boost.

A Eliz. said...

I really think the we should get new blood, starting at the top.
Kennedy is great.

Kirk said...

Just a random comment...

When the Liberals elect a new leader they should immediately launch a large TV ad campaign to introduce him or her to Canadians.

They should start saving their pennies now to fund that ad campaign. it should be as much a part of the process of choosing a new leader as anything else.

Tomm said...

4 years os a long time.

The first year can include an interim leader, a little structural re-build and a policy convention. Year 2 includes a leadership run and the re-connect with the new leader, whoever that is. The third year to bring the definition of the Liberal party forward and the re-creation of ridings and campaign process. The fourth year is the prep for and results in an election. Depending on what they have created for policy and leadership direction, they may be trying to eat away at the NDP seats, OR the Conservative seats as well as creating and bringing people into their newly formed basket.

Take time and do it right. Be careful to do it in a way where Canadian's are convinced you have worn the hair shirt for at least a year, so they see the party as being re-borne. For example, Apps and McKinnon should not be the spokespersons.

sharonapple88 said...

That Kennedy speech in Vancouver in particular- dreadful video aside- is still some of the best stuff I've heard since I joined the party.

Seconded. Gerard Kennedy was right about a number of things -- including the mistakes of the first Liberal campaign against Mike Harris' government.

Damn it, I wanted him to win in 2006.

The first year can include an interim leader, a little structural re-build and a policy convention. Year 2 includes a leadership run and the re-connect with the new leader, whoever that is. The third year to bring the definition of the Liberal party forward and the re-creation of ridings and campaign process.

I want them to work on the candidate process. One of the weaknesses in all the parties is the candidate selection. We're not going to win on this, but stories about the missing Albertan candidate, and the absent Quebec MP shines a light on the problem.