Monday, April 23, 2007

Poll: 2/3 Want Troops Home By 2009

It would appear the Liberal motion before Parliament reflects the opinion of the vast majority:
Almost two-thirds of Canadians say the country’s troops in Afghanistan should be brought home on schedule by February 2009, a new national poll says.

...fully 63 per cent say they want the troops brought home on schedule by February 2009.


Regional breakdowns are interesting:
On the specific issue of the 2009 withdrawal, residents of Atlantic Canada (73 per cent) and Quebec (69 per cent), as well as young people (67 per cent) and women (68 per cent) were more likely to say the troops should come home by then.

Residents of Alberta (45 per cent) and men (38 per cent) were more likely to say the mission should be extended to a time when political and military officials feel the country is stable and self-supporting.

Support for the mission:
The poll, conducted exclusively by Ipsos-Reid for CanWest News Service and Global National, also said a slim majority of Canadians - 52 per cent - expressed support for the troops role in Afghanistan despite a rash of eight deaths in the field since Easter Sunday.

The Liberals are right in step with the mainstream, support for the mission, but a firm timetable for withdrawal. The Liberal position looks downright reasonable and balanced. The numbers are even more favorable for the Liberal position when you exclude Alberta, if your measure is electoral prospects. Also, Dion has a solid talking point in Quebec.

If I could offer my two cents to Liberal strategists, I would use this polls findings whenever Harper starts criticizing the Liberal position. Are you saying that the vast majority of Canadians are Taliban sympathizers, national security flip floppers and weak patriots?

11 comments:

joe said...

After we bring home the troops we can bring over the Taliban and let them stay with Steffie. I hear he makes great flip flop soup!

Anonymous said...

"joe" before you go believing what Harper said "out of context" check your facts.

Dion said something had to be done, he did mention "to Canada" BUT said that this wasn't the best solution but something had to be done. He used it to stress that things couldn't be left as they were.

Learn to read or watch the press conference.

Scott Tribe said...

When more of NATO is willing to help us out, I'll change my mind. But, I think this is the proper way to go; NATO has been lazy.. letting us and Britain and the US shoulder the burden while the rest either don't send troops or put their troops in safer area farther north. There are 3 nations shouldering the burden of this.. where are the rest of our allies?

Perhaps if we impose a deadline saying we're leaving.. NATO will wake up.




The Canadian public clearly support Dion's position and the Liberals position.

Woman at Mile 0 said...

No we cannot allow this to continue. That is for certain. I can't believe our government allowed it to happen in the first place. I am deeply ashamed of my government and my country for facilitating a process of torture for Afghan prisoners of war.

joe said...

Didn't listen to Harper. I got my information from the CBC website!
And they implied that there was a time between Dioh's initial idea and when he recanted.
Maybe Stefie should learn not to have brain cramps in front of reporters.

Gayle said...

It will not be long before the Conservatives claim pulling out in 2009 was what they planned all along. In fact - they campaigned on it!

Decoin said...

cut and run and let the slaughter in Afghanistan begin in earnest - long live the Taliban.

Stephen said...

The numbers are even more favorable for the Liberal position when you exclude Alberta

Here are the Alberta numbers:

Residents of Alberta (45 per cent) and men (38 per cent) were more likely to say the mission should be extended to a time when political and military officials feel the country is stable and self-supporting.

Ironically, 'staying until stability is achieved' was the Liberal position back in late 2005, when Bill Graham refused to be pinned down on timelines:

"...[W]e must remain there long enough at least allow President Karzai's government to have control over the situation in that own country. If we do not pacify that region and if we do not deal with that particular region, the chances of stabilization in Afghanistan will never take place."

Graham was then defending a mission he admitted lacked balance, because he said the focus had to be on establishing security before serious development efforts could take place.

Ironic, as I say, because that's precisely the argument the Conservatives are making today.

Anonymous said...

The Harper (Bush copying) COnservatives keep using the phrase flip-flop. You know, like they did to John Kerry. As it turns out Kerry was right.

Dion isn't flip-flopping - he's re-assessing and perhaps if Bush had re-assessed he wouldn't be in the mess he's in today.

Smart people re-assess periodically - it's the right thing to do.

Steve V said...

decoin

The NDP supports "cut and run", the Liberal position is a firm timetable for withdrawal.

Scott is right about NATO. If troops are needed beyond 2009, we can say with a completely clear conscience, we MORE than did our part, someone else can come to the forefront. Having said that, it's not like we abandon Afghanistan after 2009, just the military component, which in my view will never be a solution anyways.

Steve V said...

anon

Substitute flip flop for pragmatism, a concept ideologues can't comprehend. Stubborn isn't a virtue.