Monday, June 16, 2008

THUD

That's the sound of the latest Conservative attacks ads falling flat, proving once again that with each successive predictable campaign (this being the sixth seperate set of attack ads), voters begin to tune you out. These are pretty conclusive poll results:
According to the Innovative poll, of those who were aware of the ads, 60 per cent said they were left with a negative impression of them, and 20 per cent said they were left with a positive impression, while 18 per cent said neither.

Impressions of the ads did not seem to lend a significant advantage to either the Tories or the Liberals, however. Thirty-one per cent of respondents said they were more likely to vote Liberal as a result of the ads, 33 per cent said less likely, and 36 per cent said neither. For the Conservatives, 22 per cent of respondents said they were more likely to vote Tory as a result of the ads, 51 per cent said they were less likely, and 25 per cent said neither.

Wow, that's pretty impressive, by 3-1 voters are left with a negative impression, and it is the CONSERVATIVE brand which suffers more. I've heard the ads on the radio a half dozen times now, and listening to their amateurish tone and juvenile messaging, is this really surprising?

Expanding the base?:
"Overall, the ads seem to have worked well with the Conservative base but have not worked with anyone else," said an Innovative Research summary of the poll results.

I'm not sure the "base" was the idea here, but it looks like they've effectively turned off any potential support.

I've said this before, and this poll supports the theme, these type of ads are now at the point of saying more about the source than the target. These attacks reinforce a cementing theme of a mean-spirited, negative, bullying bunch of hyper-partisans. Prior to this latest round, everyone knew the Conservative weaknesses, and yet they plow ahead with a plan that just highlights the unattractive. Pure genius I say.

13 comments:

Anonymous said...

I think the polls are missing the point that the ads are only meant to plant seeds of thoughts about Dion, so that come election time there will be something to harvest.

Even though the ads have a negative immediate impression, it is the long-term effect that will be damaging.

Steve V said...

anon

I was waiting for that response. It's the easy out, to comfort one, in the face of overwhelming rejection. 20% in support is abysmal?

People forget the messenger here, does anyone think the Cons have any credibility on the environment?

Steve V said...

Speaking of harvests, the Liberals should have a bunker crop to support the idea that this is a negative, mean-spirited group of bullies. Whatever damage people think, which isn't supported AT ALL here, I am quite comfortable in thinking it is completely negated by the negative impression left of those attacking. This is like a boomerang ad if you ask me, and I'm basing that on everything I've seen on where the Cons need to grow. You think this tripe appeals to women voters, who generally react less positively too negative ads?

Red Tory said...

The campaign created a lot of buzz for what…. A week? And mostly just in southern Ontario. The fears about a carbon tax (“tax shift” or whatever) were already in most people’s heads anyway — even those ostensibly supporting the concept (I can’t say “plan” because there wasn’t one yet) — so it’s not like it raised a bogeyman nobody had considered. If anything, the Conservatives may have done Dion a favour by removing any doubts concerning how any such carbon tax “plan” would be attacked. This gives Dion the opportunity to craft his approach accordingly, with these now familiar lines of attack clearly in mind.

Additionally, it has to be noted that the Conservative’s negative campaign also highlighted the glaring fact their approach on the environment and CO2 emissions is woefully lacking — or at least is regarded as such by the public. Finally, it solidified the notion amongst many that the Harper government is firmly tied to the interests of the oil companies, which given the price of gas these days isn’t a particularly good thing.

Steve V said...

"If anything, the Conservatives may have done Dion a favour by removing any doubts concerning how any such carbon tax “plan” would be attacked. This gives Dion the opportunity to craft his approach accordingly, with these now familiar lines of attack clearly in mind.

RT, we think alike here:

"it afforded the Liberals the rare opportunity of having floated a vague plan, having everyone else expose their criticisms, which allowed for "tweaking" to address those attacks. In the end, the plan would already incorporate the counter talking points, which should result in a better package."

Thanks for the link :)


I would add, a good portion of that week of coverage surrounding the Tories not being able to run their ads at gas stations, hardly a media coup. I'm not sure if the ads are playing extensively everywhere, but the radio stations I listen to have played them a lot. They're so cheesy, the fake talk show caller, it's like the Cons think we operating at a Grade Two level.

Red Tory said...

I don't think the campaign impressed anyone, including some of their own supporters who found it "embarrassing" and "juvenile"...

Apparently it was a hit with the Kool-Aid® crowd though. You know, the ones who'd vote for a toasted cheese sandwich if it had a "C" branded onto it.

Steve V said...

Are those the same people who only order half a bagel? ;)

Anonymous said...

The other "anonymous" is right. The public loves to say how much they hate "negative ads" and then 10 minutes later the same people who were going on about how they hate negative ads are inadvertently parroting the talking points from the ads they claim to hate.

The way to measure the effectiveness of the Conservative ads is NOT to ask people directly whether they like the ads or not. The trick is to see if exposure to the ads succeeds in increasing Canadians view that Dion's Carbon Tax will actually be a tax grab.

Steve V said...

"The public loves to say how much they hate "negative ads""

Oh, the other comfort blanket. Whatever, I still say THUD. Apparently, we learn today that they rushed the campaign, to deflect from Bernier. You can tell :)

Anonymous said...

People in glass houses better not throw stones. I still remember "TROOPS IN THE STREETS. IN CANADA!! WE ARE NOT MAKING THIS UP"

Gayle said...

Of course you do anon.

And how well did those ads work for the LPC?

David Toronto said...

Could someone please explain why Ryan Sparrow and Doug Finley are still working for CPC? After all they've done to bring down the party from the inside, one would think that they'd be shown the door.

Or . . .is there such a shortage of talent that the party has to keep them on because it's so hard to recruit.

Doug Finley is the husband of Minister Diane Finley of Immigration.

Talk about controversy! Each of them separately is proof the party is in a parlous state.

Steve V said...

"People in glass houses better not throw stones. I still remember "TROOPS IN THE STREETS. IN CANADA!! WE ARE NOT MAKING THIS UP"

Good comparison anon.


"Or . . .is there such a shortage of talent that the party has to keep them on because it's so hard to recruit."

David, the best part about the recent missteps, it should put the "we play chess, while you play checkers" vascade to bed. I fail to see why anyone should be intimidated.